Connemara: Listening to the Wind #2020

Connemara: Listening to the Wind By Tim Robinson Connemara Listening to the Wind In Tim Robinson established himself as one of Ireland s most brilliant nonfiction writers with the two volume Stones of Aran a tribute to the unspoiled wild of Ireland s Aran Islands With Conne
  • Title: Connemara: Listening to the Wind
  • Author: Tim Robinson
  • ISBN: 9781844880652
  • Page: 233
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Connemara: Listening to the Wind By Tim Robinson In 1999, Tim Robinson established himself as one of Ireland s most brilliant nonfiction writers with the two volume Stones of Aran, a tribute to the unspoiled wild of Ireland s Aran Islands With Connemara, he creates an indelible portrait of a small corner of the world From the unmarked graves of unbaptized infants to the shimmering peaks of the Twelve Pins, Robinson briIn 1999, Tim Robinson established himself as one of Ireland s most brilliant nonfiction writers with the two volume Stones of Aran, a tribute to the unspoiled wild of Ireland s Aran Islands With Connemara, he creates an indelible portrait of a small corner of the world From the unmarked graves of unbaptized infants to the shimmering peaks of the Twelve Pins, Robinson brings his close attention and dazzling prose to describe the mountains, bogs, shorelines, and landscape of his home and, at the same time, make a great statement about the world at large.
    Connemara: Listening to the Wind By Tim Robinson
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      Tim Robinson

    About "Tim Robinson"

    1. Tim Robinson

      A native of Yorkshire, Tim Robinson studied maths at Cambridge and then worked for many years as a visual artist in Istanbul, Vienna and London, among other places In 1972 he moved to the Aran Islands In 1986 his first book, Stones of Aran Pilgrimage, was published to great acclaim The second volume of Stones of Aran, subtitled Labyrinth, appeared in 1995 His latest book is Connemara Since 1984 he has lived in Roundstone, Connemara.

    695 thoughts on “Connemara: Listening to the Wind”

    1. This was a great treat for me as a fan of literature that evokes a particular place and community whether fictional like Wendell Berry s series set in rural Kentucky or immersive travel accounts like Chatwin s In Patagonia This connected set of essays marries personal explorations of nature and geography with history and folklore for the southern region of Connemara This highly rural province of Galway County in west central Ireland, roughly 60 by 40 miles in area, is beautiful in its range of b [...]


    2. Connemara Listening to the wind, by Tim Robinson, 2006 This book reminded me why I read I learned a lot I was moved often it caused me to think my own thoughts I got into a conversation with the author in the margins of the book the writing was compelling, descriptive, and often just beautiful Even now, writing this, I can feel my heart beating, living life just a bit fully because my sense of life has been enriched by another s.Listen to this, just one of many passages I could pick the author [...]


    3. I visited Connemara for the first time last summer and fell in love with its beauty I know it s a harsh place to live still but, like the far north west of Scotland, on a beautiful day there is nowhere stunning on this earth This book is a love letter to Connemara s landscape, its history and its people and all I want to do now is go back and read it again there so that I can visit all the places he writes about myself Highly recommended.


    4. The Irish Language in Tim Robinson s Connemara TrilogyFor the title of the last volume in his Connemara trilogy, Tim Robinson looked to Patrick Pearse and his dream of a little Gaelic kingdom nestling in the intricate coves and islands in the southern part of the region Indeed, Galway County is still part of the Gaeltacht, the area of Ireland where Irish is used by the community on a daily basis Irish is the first official language of the Republic of Ireland, according to its Constitution BBC, n [...]


    5. Robinson is a crazy man British living in Ireland, a mathematician by trade, and obsessed by the notion of place His concern of all that modernity has stripped from us, our loss of a sense of rootedness, of knowing the ground beneath us, is the biggest Crazy Jane Talks to the Cartographer.


    6. The structure of this book was maddening to me Because he is looking at various places which he approaches spatially, he often repeats references or stories, or he says I ll tell you about that later not a direct quote, but if I weren t so lazy it would be easy to find one So, when he tells you about it later, you feel like you ve already heard about it.I also find most nature writing uninteresting, which does not mean I find nature uninteresting I just have trouble picturing the land the way he [...]




    7. A.A Milne once forwarded the concept that a simple map can be the gateway to a great vacation taken in the mind imagining the turns and bends of the roads, the bridges and rivers and streams Tim Robinson, a cartographer by trade, presents a word picture gazetteer for such a trip with his volumes on the Connemara District and the Aran Islands of Ireland.It has been charged, although never unkindly, that they are unfocused, rambling works and so they are But they are such by need and nature, for s [...]


    8. I wanted very much to love this book, about a gorgeous region and town I fell in love with the book was also a gift While I found several passages very engaging, overall I could never get in to it I am sure some people will love the meandering style, and Robinson is a than competent writer, but and I am surprising myself here I needed meat tying together the narrative There are some nice turns of phrase from Robinson and thoughtful mini essays within, on ecology, wind turbines and the local pe [...]


    9. Wow I ve known about Tim Robinson for year having used his wonderful maps of The Burren and the Aaron Islands as guides for hiking and finding wonderful neolithic and Iron Age ruins in my favorite areas of Ireland I staying in Connemara this year and absolutely loved reading this first book of his decades of explorations of that area Unfortunately, the map he made is no longer in print, and, although he still lives in Roundstone, his wife s illness has kept him from doing any new copies of it I [...]


    10. A beautiful book As reflective as meditation While the odd chapter might be a bit local to someone who doesn t know the area, for the most part it is universal Robinson walks through the bogs of Connemara at one with the environment There is history, biology, archeology, geology in every step Enlightening and uplifting.One of the best books I have read in a long time.


    11. This joyous exploration of a place I am very familiar with is not about Galway It is about looking It is about the importance of stopping to smell, taste, feel and explore the worlds we live in it is about experience And it is quietly engrossing with a seductive and conversational erudition.





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